Supreme Court’s Justice Dotse Gives Stern Advice to Newly Appointed Judges


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Justice Dotse explained that the new feat they have achieved requires them to be courageous, as there are bound to be external pressures, which might tilt their focus in the course of delivering justice

At the swearing in of newly appointed circuit court judges and magistrates in Accra, a Justice of the Supreme Court Jones Dotse, advised the newly sworn in judges to be bold and brave in making decisions over cases brought before them. According to him, it is the only way the bench can exercise its authority and independence within the society.

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Justice Dotse2
Justice Dotse

Justice Dotse explained that the new feat they have achieved requires them to be courageous, as there are bound to be external pressures which might attempt to tilt their focus in the course of delivering justice. He added that though a judge’s decisions emerge from a panel, he would be held solely responsible for each decision he takes. For that reason, he urged them to exhibit profound discernment when the chips are down.

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Chief Justice of Ghana, Georgina Theodora Wood, swore-in 12 Circuit Court Judges and 7 Magistrates, on August 11, in Accra. Mrs. Wood, who administered the oath of allegiance, the judicial oath and the oath of secrecy, urged the newly appointed judges to exercise high level of excellence in their duties.

Speaking also at the event, the Attorney General and Minister of Justice, Marietta Brew Oppong, cautioned judges not to turn themselves into demi-gods in their course of delivering justice. She pointed out that though they are responsible for ensuring that justice prevails, they are not gods and should not portray themselves as such.

Urging them to be firm but fair, she also asked them to demonstrate due courtesy towards, lawyers, litigants, court officials, witnesses, the general public, Police, law students, journalists, as well as other court users.