Scientific Polls Show I’ll Win Without Much Ado – Mahama

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Per Mahama’s scientific polls, the President says he will win the election ‘one touch’!

President John Dramani Mahama has made yet another prediction for the 2016 general elections, which comes off December 7. The President has said that various independent scientific polls indicate he will win the elections in December without much difficulty.

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President Mahama said this while speaking on URA Radio on Wednesday, after completing his tour of the Upper East Region. During his interaction, the President expressed confidence over the said predictions of a win for him, adding that his party will win the general elections.

However, Mahama failed to specifically mention the organizations which made the predictions in his favour. The so called Mahama’s scientific polls according to the President, reflect the feedback from his campaign activities across the country.



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The President during the interaction said that the NDC’s campaign messages have been tailored to specifically address the respective concerns of various regions in the country. Mahama also said there have been enthusiastic responses from the people towards the messages throughout the NDC’s campaigns.

Mahama’s confidence of a win has remained unshaken, despite a number of online polls which gave NPP’s Nana Addo a lead over him. The President who is highly positive of a win come in December, believes also there won’t be a run-off in this year’s elections.

The absolute confidence shown by Flagbearers of the two main contending party ahead of the elections, has indeed left Ghanaians breathless with anticipation and anxiety, regarding the possible outcome of the polls. President Mahama of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) and Nana Akufo-Addo of the New Patriotic Party (NPP), have in recent time declared themselves winners of the general elections, leaving respective party supporters in total uncertainty of how things are likely to turn out.