Naama D/A Primary: Headmaster Turns His 5-Bedroom House Into Classrooms for Public School


Naama DA primary, a public school in Sekyere East District of the Ashanti Region was established in 2012 by the community without classrooms and was later adopted by the district assembly. At the time, students were forced to take their lessons under trees. The no-seat system was changed when the headmaster, Amankwah Ampofo, voluntarily turned his 5-bedroom house into classrooms.

Reports say the District Assembly of the area adopted the primary school but was not able to provide any form of help to resource the school. The headmaster of the school, Mr. Amankwah Ampofo about four years ago volunteered his newly constructed house as classroom block to enhance teaching and learning.

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Naama DA Primary

For learning purposes, the kindergarten and primary one have been merged into one class, while primary two and three have also been merged as one due to lack of more rooms to serve as classrooms. The two highest classes, primary 5 and 6 have separate rooms in the building as their classrooms.

Speaking with TV3, Mr Ampofo said he decided to sacrifice his building as school block for the pupils in his quest to make teaching and learning more effective. The pupils were always threatened by the rains making the environment so unconducive for learning, hence Mr Amankwah’s decision. Speaking further during the interaction, the headmaster said he was left with no choice other than converting his 5-bedroom apartment into classrooms to enhance learning and teaching. This was despite the children’s constant abuse of the building.

Speaking further during the interaction, the headmaster said he was left with no choice other than converting his 5-bedroom apartment into classrooms. This is despite the children’s constant abuse of the building.

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Mr. Amankwa hoped that authorities would provide the small school with a full classroom block within a short time. Though the District Assembly has taken up to five years without an answer, the headmaster is optimistic of a positive response. The District Assembly is said to have started the construction of a three-unit classroom block, but works have since been halted due to inadequate funds to pay the contractor working on the project.

However, according to the Ghana Education Service standard, a primary school requires at least eight classrooms to run effectively. This means that the 3-unit classroom block even upon completion will not be adequate for the school. Some of the pupils woild still have to use a portion of the headmaster’s house as their classrooms.