Rawlings and Kufuor: Facts About Existing Bad Blood Between Ghana’s Past Leaders


Rawlings and Kufuor – Good observers will notice that bad blood still exists between past leaders JJ Rawlings and Kufuor. A problem of ego or unsettled differences, we cannot decipher.

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Former President John Agyekum Kufuor, says he would have loved to have a cordial relationship with his predecessor, Jerry John Rawlings, but that desire is proving elusive. According to him, the former Military dictator must know what to say and accord him some respect.

Rawlings has been heard on several occasions attacking Mr. Kufuor describing him as corrupt.

The most recent of his attacks was when he recently asserted that Mr. Kufuor desecrated the memory of Ghana’s first President, Osagyefo Dr. Kwame Nkrumah when he allowed his wife, Fatima Nkrumah, to be buried on the same compound as the first President.

But speaking on Starr Chat Wednesday evening, former President Kufuor told host Bola Ray that Rawlings’ incessant attacks on him are unfounded.

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According to him, he wishes to keep an amicable relationship with Rawlings, but the latter’s continuous demeaning of his personality in public has marred many chances of achieving that.

I would have preferred being friendly with him but every now and then somehow he will burst out saying unfounded things about me and making me feel awkward

He stated that Rawlings should master how to speak decently about others especially as he holds a prestigious status as the longest serving Head of State. This according to Kufuor should be enough to make Rawlings conscious of himself when speaking about others.

Kufuor’s victory over John Evans Atta Mills after the end of Jerry Rawlings’ second term marked the first peaceful democratic transition of power in Ghana since independence in 1957.

He was a minister in Kofi Abrefa Busia’s Progress Party government during Ghana’s Second Republic and a Popular Front Party opposition frontbencher during the Third Republic.

In the Fourth Republic, he stood as the New Patriotic Party’s candidate at the 1996 election, and then led it to victory in 2000 and 2004.