The First Black Female Neurosurgeon Has Just Emerged from Hopkins University and You Want To Know Her Country


Nancy Abu-Bonsrah has been trending on the web and on various social media platforms for emerging the first black female to graduate from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as a Neurosurgeon.

Nancy who is a Ghanaian, was among final year medical students from various medical institutions in the United States of America who participated in the 2017 Match Day on Friday March 17, ahead of their residency training in the coming summer.

Nancy Abu-Bonsrah
Miss Nancy Abu-Bonsrah on the Match Day

Several congratulatory messages have been pouring in on twitter, especially from the Ghanaian community, who are massively identifying with Miss Abu-Bonsrah over her record-breaking achievement.

Also Meet Cecilia Anim, The Ghanaian Woman Who Won England’s Prestigious CBE Award

Topmost on the list is the one coming from Hopkins Medical News which congratulated Nancy Abu-Bonsrah for being among the 2017 graduate Neurosurgeons from the prestigious American University. See a screenshot of tweet below.

Nancy-Abu-bonsrah1



Other friends also took to twitter to identify with, as well as pour out their honour and congratulations to the medical genius. Among them is Mizpeh, who posted photos of Miss Nancy, letting the world know she is the first black female neurosurgeon at Johns Hopkins. See original tweet below.

Nancy Abu-Bonsrah is the daughter of Seth and Georgina Abu-Bonsrah – natives of Ghana. She is emerging the first physician produced by the Abu-Bonsrah family – both nuclear and extended. She has about 36 medical research paper publications to her credit. Some she solely authored, and others she co-authored. Some of Nancy’s published works include:

Johns Hopkins University is a popular American tertiary institution founded in 1876. It was christened after its first patron – an American philanthropist, Johns Hopkins. Since after the over hundred years of the school’s inception, Miss Abu-Bonsrah is the first black female to graduate from Johns Hopkins Department of Neurosurgery.